Posts Tagged ‘this weekend in Sydney’

So, this weekend, we followed a City of Sydney Irish walk which took as through some of the significant places where events concerning Irish immigrants in the young colony of Sydney occurred.

We learnt that

  • about 20,000 people were in Hyde Park on St Patrick’s Day in 1878 when there was an anti-Catholic riot.
  • that monument on the road at the top of the hill near St Mary’s Cathedral on the road to the Art Gallery was just a drinking fountain.
  • There’s a significant Irish Famine memorial at Hyde Park Barracks. Really cleverly done, it shows a dining table divided by a wall.
    • During the six years of great Irish Famine, when their potato crop was ruined by potato blight, about one million died and another one million left Ireland. The memorial remembers the 4114 orphan girls who were shipped to the Australian colonies. Some married, others were employed for different domestic work.
  • The original Martin Place only ran between George and Pitt Streets.
IMG_8186

Drinking Fountain

 

IMG_8188

Irish Famine Memorial at Hyde Park Barracks

 

IMG_8187

Irish Famine Memorial at Hyde Park Barracks

 

IMG_8190

State Library

 

IMG_8189

The windows are inspired by the Book of Kells

 

IMG_8184

St Mary’s Cathedral

 

smc

St Mary’s Cathedral

 

Advertisements

We went for a walk with the pup around Callan Park, 60ha site in Lilyfield near the Iron Cove Bridge.

It became famous as a psychiatric hospital (Callan Park Hospital for the Insane) which was in use until 1994.

Thne buildings are now occupied by the Sydney College of the Arts.

The Bay Run runs through the park along the foreshore of Iron Cove.

Lots of off leash dog area to roam. Some beautiful old buildings in what was a very sad place for so many people. You’d like to think we are a bit better these days at caring for those struggling with mental health.

IMG_8709

IMG_7826

IMG_8710

IMG_8712

IMG_8713

IMG_8717

IMG_8718

IMG_8719

IMG_8720

 

 

Our new pup Indie’s first proper walk. We forgot to take a pic of her first cafe outing!
A wander down this lovely strip this afternoon, following this guide from North Sydney Council.

IMG_7732
We’ve walked down this street before and never noticed the former Presbyterian School Hall

IMG_7731
1976! 1976! This chimney standing beside the fence at 126 Blues Point Rd belonged to a small cottage built in the 1860s. It was the last in the municipality to have electricity connected in 1976.

Dead Central. the State Library’s current exhibition, is on display in Sydney.

Did you know that Central Station was the site of the colony’s first major cemetery? Thousands of graves were moved to accommodate the new station, which parliament wanted initially built in Hyde Park to avoid disruption.

Graves were moved to other cemeteries across Sydney.

A great exhibition – heaps of photos and a great audio guide. And FREE!

www.sl.nsw.gov.au/audio-dc

This weekend we were at Parramatta for an event, so we tacked on the Harris Park Heritage Walk for a historical wander through colonial western Sydney.

The Harris Park Heritage Walk is an initiative of Discover Parramatta
It’s poorly signposted as you leave Parramatta ferry wharf but is a good wander through Experiment Farm Cottage, Hambledon Cottage and Elizabeth Farm.

IMG_7510

IMG_7511

IMG_7512

IMG_7513

This weekend we followed a tour from https://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au called Skirting Sydney.
It focused on The Rocks and around Martin Place. This tour pinpoints key sites where girls and women lived and worked, where they were educated and entertained, and where pioneering activist women held meetings, published journals and sometimes in the process expanded the possibilities for all women’s lives.
Good stuff.

57691028159__2CFAF311-DC24-4D62-9BFE-37816635A7F5  57691029107__7593C745-2EB8-4D81-A468-1830F265E4AA

IMG_7330     IMG_7329     IMG_7328     IMG_7327IMG_7326

 

IMG_7331

Kate Street is near Kissing Point Road and is a dead end street set amongst houses that are very similar to my grandmother’s house, all built probably around the early 1900s. Lots of huge gardens, huge trees, and a distinct lack of lawns owing to the shade and leaf letter.
At the end of Kate Street is Mimosa Oval and National Park or Forest that runs the whole way to Avondale Dam which is near Pymble ladies’ College.
There’s lots of Fox baiting going on in the area so Bailey didn’t do too much exploring.