Posts Tagged ‘What to do in Sydney this weekend’

Forsyth Park at Neutral Bay, in the shade of Nth Sydney CBD.

Off leash dogs allowed when there’s no sport being played.

Community garden, historic (never used) oil containers for the war effort, playground and a bush path to enjoy.

Love Sydney.

Great off leash fenced dog areas, a dip in the Lane Cove River, a walk along the foreshore, a lovely walk through the industrial and residential streets.

A great walk through another part of Terrys Creek through Eastwood.

There’s a path connecting Fred Spurway Reserve and James Hoskin Reserve and Kilpack Park (The Ponds Creek.)

Cowells Lane Reserve at Dundas is an ENORMOUS off leash park, perfect for a walk for you and your dog.

There’s a creek for her to roll in and get muddy, a level (wheelchair friendly) path for walking, a fenced playground… this park has it all.

Had a lovely walk around Parramatta Park.

No off leash areas, and the cafe was closed (!) but still, a good spot for a walk.

Fitting a new muzzle lead – she’s not impressed!
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Remember these? The attendant would place his foot on the lever to admit one person at a time through the turnstile.
Lovingly restored at the back of the new Parramatta Oval

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Never knew Parramatta Park had so many bats!

I’ve said this a number of times before – I’ve lived around here for 40 odd years and never been for a walk through here.

I don’t think we have ever seen so many termite nests!

There’s a great path right around the lagoon at Narrabeen on Sydney’s northern beaches.

A busy path, lots of walkers and bike riders.

7 or 8 kilometres.

So, this weekend, we followed a City of Sydney Irish walk which took as through some of the significant places where events concerning Irish immigrants in the young colony of Sydney occurred.

We learnt that

  • about 20,000 people were in Hyde Park on St Patrick’s Day in 1878 when there was an anti-Catholic riot.
  • that monument on the road at the top of the hill near St Mary’s Cathedral on the road to the Art Gallery was just a drinking fountain.
  • There’s a significant Irish Famine memorial at Hyde Park Barracks. Really cleverly done, it shows a dining table divided by a wall.
    • During the six years of great Irish Famine, when their potato crop was ruined by potato blight, about one million died and another one million left Ireland. The memorial remembers the 4114 orphan girls who were shipped to the Australian colonies.¬†Some married, others were employed for different domestic work.
  • The original Martin Place only ran between George and Pitt Streets.

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Drinking Fountain

 

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Irish Famine Memorial at Hyde Park Barracks

 

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Irish Famine Memorial at Hyde Park Barracks

 

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State Library

 

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The windows are inspired by the Book of Kells

 

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St Mary’s Cathedral

 

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St Mary’s Cathedral

 

We went for a walk with the pup around Callan Park, 60ha site in Lilyfield near the Iron Cove Bridge.

It became famous as a psychiatric hospital (Callan Park Hospital for the Insane) which was in use until 1994.

Thne buildings are now occupied by the Sydney College of the Arts.

The Bay Run runs through the park along the foreshore of Iron Cove.

Lots of off leash dog area to roam. Some beautiful old buildings in what was a very sad place for so many people. You’d like to think we are a bit better these days at caring for those struggling with mental health.

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Our new pup Indie’s first proper walk. We forgot to take a pic of her first cafe outing!
A wander down this lovely strip this afternoon, following this guide from North Sydney Council.

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We’ve¬†walked down this street before and never noticed the former Presbyterian School Hall

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1976! 1976! This chimney standing beside the fence at 126 Blues Point Rd belonged to a small cottage built in the 1860s. It was the last in the municipality to have electricity connected in 1976.